Categories
Brand design

When cricket was simpler (without the electronics)

Over here in Australia cricket is in a parlous state. Two Tests played and two lost. As someone who holds dual nationality it would be natural to think  I would have divided opinions. Not so. My loyalties lie with the English in Test cricket. However, I am disappointed with the introduction of so many methods to dispute an umpires instant decision. Back in 1934 it was much simpler, and I offer this advertisement, from Paper and Print, as acknowledgement. (Incidentally, Australia won the Nottingham Test – 8 to 12 June – by 238 runs, with Bradman contributing just 54 to the Aussies totals. Australia went on to win the series.)

The Great Test

Categories
Brand design Typographic ephemera

Something sunny for a European summer weekend

In the midst of the Australian winter, please accept ‘Sunny Jim’, taken from Vol. 7, n.26 of Paper and Print, 1934.

sunny jim

Categories
lettering

Back from a break – signwriters at work

It’s been a while since the last post (four months). I will ease myself in gently with this photo of men at work painting a sign. The craft of sign writing is alive and well here in Australia. For those interested another post can be found on signwriting here.

closing down

Categories
Brand design

Plain paper packaging – Australia style

I am not a smoker. At least not now. I gave up when I was in my 30s. These images are from packets I have found on the kerbside, in the road, in waste-paper baskets. This is the Australian response to cigarette advertising. The so-called ‘plain paper packaging’ response. The campaign has been nominated for a graphics award. See here. But this is so more important than any award. Is the campaign working in Australia? Too early to tell. People will still smoke. That is their democratic right.

Warning – some readers may find these images challenging.

[Note from Feb 25 2013 : The packaging is now up for a design award. See here.]

plain paper packaging_0001 plain paper packaging_0002 plain paper packaging_0003 plain paper packaging_0004 plain paper packaging_0005 plain paper packaging_0006 plain paper packaging

Categories
typography

Bit more Johnstonia

Can’t have too much. These black and white illustrations from a book on London I picked up from a secondhand shop over Christmas.

More Johnston_0001

More Johnston
Underground poster
Categories
Brand design Thoughts on lettering

Penguins and advertising

In the early days of Penguin books advertising helped offset costs. Perhaps this is an area overlooked by today’s publishers? There is also something of interest here for the social historian. These examples were all printed during the Second World War. Notice that two of the examples are stapled (The Ragged Trousered… and Totem and Taboo). And what did happen to Greys cigarettes between the first example and the last (which is Freud – 1944 and Conrad 1942). And what is the connection between Eno’s “Fruit Salt” and The Ragged Trousered…? let alone Lotus shoes and Conrad! Notice also the change in the Penguin device between Tressall and Conrad (both 1944 publications).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
lettering

Signage being destroyed

Actually this is more about the paint being destroyed – the lettering is vinyl!

And another, this time a road sign

 

Categories
History of Lettering

John Peters, some further thoughts, especially on Fleet Titling

Back here I wrote about John Peters. Today I write about his design of a Monotype face called Fleet Titling, loosely based on Ehrhardt capitals. The company found it useful back in the late 1960s for its signage.

 

Categories
typography

A Graceful image

One of the great things about the Monotype Corporation was the advertising they produced. Take this example to promote Century Schoolbook – some creative genius at the company decided to use an image of WG Grace, with this resulting tri-fold sheet tipped into a volume of Penrose. (Regular readers of this blog will know by now how much I love those volumes.) Century Schoolbook, as stated by Monotype in accompanying literature, originated in 1894, being commissioned by Theodore L de Vinne for the Century Magazine. ‘The letterforms reflect the taste for the modern face of the late 19th century, but the design is nearer to the old styles in having sturdier serifs and no fine hair lines…The large x-height, coupled with short but adequate descenders, makes it very legible in the smaller sizes, and in the larger sizes it takes on a clean, handsome appearance, uncluttered in extraneous detail.’

For the record WG Grace (1848-1915) scored 126 individual centuries in first class cricket. He retired from competition in 1908, aged 60.

Categories
Typographic ephemera typography

Something novel for the weekend

Found in the October 1967 of the Monotype Newsletter 82, with no commentary. Does it really need any?