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eric gill Thoughts on lettering

In honour of a decade: a legacy begins

In November 2020 this blog celebrates a decade. I’m aware that in recent years I’ve not been as active as before – perhaps this is age or is it laziness? Probably a combination of both.

However.

However, over the coming months I will add to the collection as well as re-post some articles I consider still hold up interest. If you disagree, let me know. This is the age of communication and commentary and interactivity after all.

So the first is….my visit to Pigotts.  An interesting choice given my abhorrence and moral disgust of the man, yet these are pictures you will find no where else. And taken on a Pentax ME Super with Ilford HP5 film.

Yes, I was naive and I cannot offer apologies enough to his victims – his family and the many others who were lured into posing for him. Eric Gill was a serial paedophile. Period.

Do not use or recommend Gill Sans or any other of his typefaces. Period.

 

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printing Thoughts on lettering

Definition of printing…(and a note on Joanna)…

 

…’the art of making dents in paper or other impressible paper.’

So wrote Eric Gill in ‘A Glossary of Terms Relating to Printing’, 1934 – set in Joanna and part of A Specimen of Three Book Types.

For some more terms enlarge this page.

Regarding Joanna. Designed 1930 and cut by HW Caslon. Used by Hague and Gill at their press until the Aldine Press, Letchworth, UK, obtained the right to use it, because Gill needed the money. It was used in the Aldine Bible between 1934-1936. In 1939 the face was made available to Monotype, series 478. The face was named after Gill’s youngest daughter who had married Rene Hague, partner in Hague and Gill printers, based in a barn at Pigotts, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire. [From The Monotype Recorder, 41, 3, 1958; Book Design and Production, 1,3, 1958.)

Illustration showing Gill’s drawing for Joanna italic (1930 and 1931).

 

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eric gill

Mr Rene Hague

I surprise even myself with some of the things I turn up in old notebooks and journals. Such was the joy of the analogue age when one tore reports from the daily newspaper and tucked them away – waiting, in this instance, 31 years before resurfacing. Those who follow my posts on Gill will find this of interest. The Times obituary writer has a nice turn of phrase: ‘Intellectually, however, he was never dominated by the patriarchal Gill…’