Categories
History of Lettering

New Year’s Quiz – final (and a little late)

Who is this?

RK photo

Answer below

Screen Shot 2014-01-01 at 5.55.04 PM

 

Incidentally, the main image of Koch, taken from Book Design and production (1959), gives the date of the photograph as c1938. This is clearly incorrect as Koch died in 1934. Perhaps 1928 was meant?

Categories
calligraphy

Spot the difference – futura

These illustrations are from a wonderful book called Lettering for Advertising, by Mortimer Leach, 1956. In those days (think Mad Men) advertising drawings were done by hand. I’ll have more to show from this book in future posts.

Sufficient to show the example from his example of how to draw Futura by hand.

Categories
alphabet Brand design Elements of Lettering eric gill History of Lettering lettering Thoughts on lettering typography

UHU glue, Futura and Kabel

UHU Glue is one of the most distinctive brands around, simple use of black on yellow, strong typeface that underscores the strength of the product. Futura dates back to 1927, designed by German printer Paul Renner during a period when designers were looking at ways to create a geometric sans-serif. It may owe its genesis to work by Edward Johnston and his famous alphabet for London Underground

On launch Futura was criticised as being ‘block letters for block heads’ but over 80 years later it still looks good. According to Alexander Lawson, author of Anatomy of a Typeface (Hamish Hamilton, 1990), for whom I am indebted for the basis of this article, ‘the type became enormously successful and instigated a sans-serif renaissance that quickly spread from Europe to the US’.

It inspired other designers, among them Rudolf Koch who designed Kabel, made public also in 1927. Lawson notes that in the lowercase the ‘e reaches back to the VEnetian period in its retention of the slanted crossbar’ while in the uppercase ‘several letters are unique in having slanted stroke endings’.

As an end note Gill Sans was launched in 1928 by Monotype in the UK but, writes Lawson, ‘the American Monotype firm refused to offer the Gill type for the American market’, which is how Futura became so widely used there.

Categories
calligraphy Elements of Lettering lettering lettering, typography, alphabets, stonework typography

Neuland typeface

To those unfamiliar with Rudolph Koch this should come as a beauty. It is real stonecarvers face, bold, strong, very German. This illustration is taken from that marvellous volume Book Production Notes by Newdigate, mentioned in a recent post.

Bernard writes: “Like others of Koch’s types, the Neuland seems to have been designed, not with pen or pencil on paper, but with a cutting tool on wood or soft metal”.

[Click on image to enlarge.]

 

See also this post of December 2014.