Categories
Newspapers

The Gazette – part three

Part Three [if you missed part one click here and for part two here]

DDG IntertypeHistory of the Don Dorrigo Gazette taken from the centenary issue (Wednesday, January 20, 2010): DDG wood furniture

‘Founders of the Gazette Herb and Reg Vincent arrived in Dorrigo in 1909 and were thrilled at the country and surrounding district. They settled in the community…on January 8, 1910…the first copies of the Don Dorrigo Gazette were pulled off the old Columbian, a second-hand Double Royal “thoroughly overhauled and guaranteed in good order and condition” by FT Wimble and Co Ltd, Sydney…There have been several owners of the Gazette, starting with the Vincent Brothers sold to George Holland in 1938, Bill Beckhouse in the 1950s and John English in the late 1970s.’

DDG galley‘The original Columbian printing press was replaced by a Wharfedale hand-fed machine…This was replaced by a modern Heidelberg cylinder press still in use today…A new typesetting machine, the Intertype, was installed at a cost of £3,288 in 1953.’

‘The Wharfedale…was believed to be 114 years old before being replaced by the Heidelberg cylinder press in 1970.’

From the Don Dorrigo Gazette of Thursday, October 17, 1957:

‘The Dorrigo Gazette has installed a modern Autovic automatic printing press…[it] takes the place of a hand-fed platen which the Gazette has donated to the Dorrigo District School.’ [My note: Where is it now?]

Former editors: Reg Vincent; George Holland; Charlie Chappel; Jack Devine; ‘Flip’ Pomroy; Sel Rawson; Jim Ellis; Alan Smith; John English and [current] Michael English.

‘When John English started his apprenticeship in 1961 Alan Smith was foreman; later he took over as editor and when Alan left for a change working with the Bellingen Shire Council, John took over as editor…’

DDG front page

 

Categories
alphabet

Times Roman Poster from Monotype

Talking about TNR in the previous post reminded me of this poster in the Monotype series

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Categories
lettering typography

Stanley Morison and book jacket design

Stanley Morison is one of the giants of 20th century  English typography, a man whose influence is felt everywhere, no less than at the Monotype Corporation where he was typographical adviser for many years. His death in 1967 prompted that company to issue a special edition of its ‘house magazine’, the Monotype Recorder, for the Autumn of 1968 from which these illustrations are taken.

The first illustrates one of Morison’s flamboyant book jackets for Victor Gollanz, publisher and left-wing advocate. Though undated it is probably from the early 1930s and demonstrates his approach in using the cover as an advertising tool for the text. The colours were chosen to make the book stand out from the crowd, a method that could well be used today – much more effective than a bland photo. (See my blog here on modern book jackets.)

The title page from the Recorder is a wonderful example of restraint. The typeface is Barbou, series 178, which has an interesting genesis as being the heavier, and Morison’s preferred, version of Fournier when first cut in 1924. For more on this see Carter (1987), Twentieth century type designers, p.34.

Categories
Thoughts on lettering typography

Typography poll – the results

Not highly scientific this, especially as the question ‘what do you consider the most influential typeface of the 20th century’ is somewhat vague. Define influential, one person commented.

For what it’s worth Helvetica and Univers topped the list,24 per cent each, while Futura put in an appearance among the also rans. Gill Sans notched up 10 per cent, and Times New Roman, Bodoni, Goudy and Caledonia brought in 5 per cent.

Comic Sans turned up too.

Categories
Thoughts on lettering

Eric Gill and Pilgrim typeface

Among the stack of books I bought from the secondhand bookstore that’s closing was a 1953 Penrose album. Penrose are fabulous volumes published yearly as a guide to that year’s graphic arts. They went from the early part of the 20th century through to the 1980s (I think).typeface

They are sumptuously illustrated and have articles by some of the most eminent typographers of the time. In this volume (which I did not have) is an article about Gill’s Pilgrim typeface by Robert Harling. This face was produced, the article says, 12 years after Gill’s death.

Manufactured by Liontype (the rivals to Monotype) it is a traditional roman.

Harling writes: “Here in Pilgrim we have all the recognisable and admirable Gill qualities. His touch is in very curve and line. Here is yet another of his felicitous essays in the unending quest for the perfect alphabet. The ceaseless and never monotonous preoccupation with the curve of the tail to the upper-case R, the distribution of solid and void in the lower case a and g and so on.”

The face was first named Bunyan, and used exclusively by Gill. After his death the design was bought from his widow, Mary, and the punches, patterns and matrices from his son-in-law Rene Hague. Linotype then adapted the face for machine setting, and also added an italic, sketches for which Gill had not completed.

Harling notes that the face was to be used in a limited edition run of Evelyn Waugh’s book, The Holy Places, published by the Queen Anne Press in the winter of 1953.

 

Categories
Thoughts on lettering

About me

My name is John Pitt. I live on the eastern seaboard of Australia in a tiny town called Terranora. I am British by birth and learnt lettercarving in the UK from a number of masters.

I have been a lettercarver, on and off, for about 20 years and been commissioned by architects, public institutions and individuals. But there is always something new to learn, to discover.

I also write.

Years ago I ran a private press, The Beeches Press, and published a few books letterpress, using a Monotype keyboard and caster and a Western proofing press.

None of them remain in print!